NFHS Continues to Permit Use of Shockstrips!

— Letter from NOCSAE | August 23, 2013

Despite the NOCSAE statement made July 16, 2013 regarding helmet add-ons decertifying the helmets, the NFHS stance on the subject “remains the same as last year” meaning – Shockstrips are still a legal piece of equipment! Read the letters from NFSH verifying the news as well as the original letter from the National Federation of State High School Associations Rules Review Committee which determined Shockstrips ARE permitted for use.

< Click image to view






PLEASE NOTE: 1) No helmet pad can prevent or eliminate the risk of concussions or other serious head injuries while playing sports; 2) Scientists have also not reached agreement on how the results of impact absorption tests relate to concussions; and 3) No conclusions about a reduction of risk or severity of concussive injury should be drawn from impact absorption tests.

NYPD’s Finest Win While Sporting Shockstrips

— Article from The Youngstown Vindicator | Saturday, April 28, 2013 | by Brandon Judeh

WARREN, OH: Nearly 15 years ago. Dr. Steven D. Novicky and his wife Kim had an idea that they thought could one day revolutionize safety for football players.

Last year, the Canfield residents they saw the idea utilized at the high school level.

On, Saturday afternoon they saw it take the next step during a semi-pro football matchup.

The New York Police Department Finest proudly displayed the Shockstrips as they took on the Cleveland Warriors in a matchup of first responders at Mollenkopf Stadium.

“This is incredible that we get to see the Shockstrips utilized on an upper level team who has extreme impact on the field,” Novicky said. “What we’re most thrilled about is that the players, coaches and parents that are here get to see it in action and see that if it’s working on an upper level team, then we need to get it at the high school level immediately.”

Novicky saw his invention in use this past fall as the Western Reserve Blue Devils football team used the strips for every one of their games. Novicky is the team physician. 


PLEASE NOTE: 1) No helmet pad can prevent or eliminate the risk of concussions or other serious head injuries while playing sports; 2) Scientists have also not reached agreement on how the results of impact absorption tests relate to concussions; and 3) No conclusions about a reduction of risk or severity of concussive injury should be drawn from impact absorption tests.

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WKBN News - Youngstown Coverage of NYPD Finest Football Showcase

— WKBN News - Youngstown Coverage of NYPD Finest Football Showcase

Original Air Date April 27, 2013 – View the segment aired on WKBN covering the NYPD Finest Football Game played in Warren, Ohio: "A Youngstown doctor, who created the Shockstrip, gave the Valley a chance to see just how well his product works.
The Finest already started using Shockstrip, which is a special pad for football helmets to decrease the chances of head injuries. They are the first semi-pro team in the United States to wear the devices. 

Dr. Steven Novicky hosted a game on Saturday featuring two hard-hitting, semi-pro football teams, the New York's Finest and the Cleveland Warriors at Warren G. Harding's Mollenkopf Stadium..."

< Click on the image to watch!


PLEASE NOTE: 1) No helmet pad can prevent or eliminate the risk of concussions or other serious head injuries while playing sports; 2) Scientists have also not reached agreement on how the results of impact absorption tests relate to concussions; and 3) No conclusions about a reduction of risk or severity of concussive injury should be drawn from impact absorption tests.

Novicky’s Shockstrips Gain Another Endorsement

NYPD semi-pro football team latest to begin using Novicky’s Shockstrips

— Article from The Youngstown Vindicator | Saturday, March 23, 2013 | by Jim Bassetti

CANFIELD, OH: Just because boys will be boys doesn’t mean that helmets have to be helmets.

Since Dr. Steve Novicky and his wife, Kim, of Canfield developed the patent-pending Shockstrips for use on football helmets for safety’s sake, the invention’s rise in acceptance seems to have gone from the countryside to the country.

Through Novicky’s connection with the Western Reserve High School football team as team physician, the strips have been used by the Blue Devils during games in rural Berlin Center and also on the road.

When the Shockstrip-equipped Western Reserve team played at Wellsville during the 2012 season, a special spectator was on hand to observe.

Detective Tony Hernandez of the New York Police Department, who is also general manager of a semi-pro football team, was a curious visitor.

“He heard about Shockstrips on Twitter and drove from New York to Wellsville to see them [Shockstrips] in action and talked to several players,” Novicky said of the GM of the New York Finest, a nationally recognized semi-pro team in the National Public Safety Football League, an athletic coalition of first responders.

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NYPD Finest Football team to get protective helmet bumpers, Shockstrip pads, to reduce impact of helmet-to-helmet contact

The extra cushioning costs $50 per helmet and is said to mitigate
the effect of helmet-to-helmet collisions by 41 percent.

— Article from The New York Daily News | Monday, March 11, 2013

Dr. Steven Novicky, creator of the pads, takes a look at the helmets he's fortifying
for the NYPD Finest Football team. Head injury has become as big a concern
in the NFL in recent years as the games themselves. There have been more
than 200 concussions reported in each of the last three NFL seasons.

They protect our neighborhoods. Now the NYPD will protect their noggins.

Members of NYPD Finest Football, the police department’s competitive semipro gridiron squad, will add “bumpers” to the outside of their helmets in hopes of avoiding NFL-style head trauma.

The extra cushioning, known as Shockstrip pads, reduces the impact of helmet-to-helmet contact by 41 percent, according to creator Dr. Steven Novicky.

They cost just $50 per helmet, and it’s a small price to pay, said NYPD Narcotics Detectives Anthony Hernandez, general manager of the team.

“The last thing we want to do is go to work with a head injury,” he said.

In fact, Hernandez thinks the NFL should follow the NYPD’s lead.

“I can’t see any organization, from pee wee to the pros, not putting their players’ safety first,” Hernandez said, adding that none of his players ever suffered a serious concussion or head injury.


PLEASE NOTE: 1) No helmet pad can prevent or eliminate the risk of concussions or other serious head injuries while playing sports; 2) Scientists have also not reached agreement on how the results of impact absorption tests relate to concussions; and 3) No conclusions about a reduction of risk or severity of concussive injury should be drawn from impact absorption tests.

Read more...

“Parents have the
  misconception
  that when their
  child puts on that
  football helmet it
  will protect them
  from virtually
  everything.”

– Dr. Steven Novicky

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